Tag Archives: society

Apologies

Apologies and other manners

When I was young, my parents taught me my manners. I’m sure yours did, too. But I have noticed that those manners have evolved over the decades. The manners I teach my children are slightly different from what my parents taught me. Why? Aren’t manners considered timeless? Well yes, but not really. Politeness varies from culture to culture. In some cultures, slurping your soup is considered polite, while in others, it is considered rude. Continue reading

love is expensive

Love is expensive?

I was reading a post on Facebook by Sharon Astyk (here is her quiet-for-now blog) who used a personal example of a crisis in her life to explain that we really don’t understand our fellow countrymen right now, and we are only just now realizing we have been completely miscommunicating for a long time.  That we need to sit down and really listen to discover how our neighbors see the world because it might be radically different than we do.  In the comments (I know, never read the comments, but her Facebook friends are generally very respectful), someone remarked, “We all desperately want to be “read” by others, and (at least for me) it’s so hard to get past innate self-centeredness and lack of communication skills. And yeah, a neighbor could be all the things we fear. Love is stronger than fear, but is expensive. But why else are we here? We’re all so needy and broken.”  Love is expensive.  Is it? Continue reading

Cheshire County

Cheshire County, NH {Thankful Thursday}

I live in a wonderful place.  I feel blessed to live in New England, and although there are many places I would like to visit, there is no place I would rather live than here.  Especially the Connecticut River Valley where it cuts through the Appalachian Mountains.  Technically, I live in the foothills of the mountains, and it is a very wonderful place to live.  Cheshire County will always be the home of my heart. Continue reading

Primate Stone Age

Primate Stone Age

I have been pondering an article I read recently that was published a little over a year ago that had the provocative title of “Chimpanzees and monkeys have entered the Stone Age.”  The implication was that this is a recent accomplishment.  Reading the article, though, showed that chimpanzees in Cote d’Ivoire have been using stone tools for thousands of years.  This isn’t something new.  Macaques in Thailand can be proven to have used them for 50 years, which I will concede qualifies as a new accomplishment if that is as far back as it goes, which I highly doubt.  Capuchins in Brazil can be documented back 700 years, which is pushing it in my mind as far as the recent evolutionary progress that I was expecting. Continue reading

Digital versus real life friendships

Digital versus real life friendships

Recently, I read an article about the opposite feelings of liberation and imprisonment that we feel from our online lives.  I have talked about the benefits of technology before, but the idea of imprisonment also strikes very close to home.  I often lament about all the time I spend online, when I could be doing more productive things.  The kids accuse me of having double standards when I am online and won’t let them watch TV.  Usually, those arguments come up when I am actually using the computer as a tool rather than as entertainment, such as balancing the checkbook, searching for a recipe to make dinner, or writing posts for this blog.  These are liberating aspects of the internet. Continue reading

Diversity in friendships

Diversity in friendships {Thankful Thursday}

In last week’s Thankful Thursday post, I praised the internet and technology for enabling us to maintain relationships over great distances, both through travel planning and by providing easy communication.  This week I want to praise the internet for bringing us other points of view so we can keep our own up to date. Continue reading

This I believe

This I believe

Today I am out of my usual routine, so I thought I would share something that I wrote for a church service this past winter.  I was asked to share my personal credo, my system of beliefs.  Since my religion does not have one specific dogma, we sometimes have services in which a handful of us share our own beliefs.  It is so fun to hear the ideas that govern each of our lives.  So here today is n explanation of my own personal religious beliefs.  I hope something here resonates with you. Continue reading

climate change incivility clutter

Climate Change, Incivility, and Clutter

Lots of horrible things happen in our world, and it seems as though there are more and more of them lately. Climate change seems to be reflected in our societal behavior, with more frequent and severe storms surprising us every time we turn around. People seem to be more rude to each other and uncivil in everyday interactions, just as the average temperature rises. But we also have our hurricanes and tornadoes that show up in society as mass shootings and other terrorist attacks. Continue reading